The Reflections of Zurynhaniran

love the way you are
Allahumma Ameen

Allahumma Ameen

Dream vacation. Rest & Read. InsyaAllah, one fine day…

Dream vacation. Rest & Read. InsyaAllah, one fine day…

Mak & abah, we love u so much.. maafkan kami yg kekadang menyakiti, hakikatnya kami sgt menyayangi.. Thanks Allah..

Mak & abah, we love u so much.. maafkan kami yg kekadang menyakiti, hakikatnya kami sgt menyayangi.. Thanks Allah..

(Source: lionofallah, via itsherlove)

muslimahbyheart:

Abû Hurayrah relates that Allah’s Messenger (peace be upon him) said: “Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should speak a good word or remain silent. And whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should show hospitality to his neighbor. And whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should show hospitality to his guest.” [ Sahîh al-Bukhârî and Sahîh Muslim ] 
Allah does not like the public mention of evil except by one who has been wronged. And ever is Allah Hearing and Knowing. [Surah An-Nisa 4:148]
O you who have believed, fear Allah and speak words of appropriate justice. He will [then] amend for you your deeds and forgive you your sins. And whoever obeys Allah and His Messenger has certainly attained a great attainment. [Surah Al-‘Ahzab 33:70-71]
Allah Azza Wa Jaal and our beloved Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) teach us to speak kindly and use good words. If not, we shouldn’t be speaking at all. We need to careful in what we say and avoid harmful words because we should be aware of the fact we are accountable for what we see, hear, or say, on the Day of Judgement. In order to ensure we are speaking only good words, we need to avoid cursing, suspicion, false accusations, backbiting, gossiping, and so on. Whatever does not hold any goodness or benefit in it should not be spoken. In ‘shaa Allah may Allah guide us. Most of all, we need to take the initiative to improve our character and guard our tongues. 

muslimahbyheart:

Abû Hurayrah relates that Allah’s Messenger (peace be upon him) said: “Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should speak a good word or remain silent. And whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should show hospitality to his neighbor. And whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day should show hospitality to his guest.”Sahîh al-Bukhârî and Sahîh Muslim 

Allah does not like the public mention of evil except by one who has been wronged. And ever is Allah Hearing and Knowing. [Surah An-Nisa 4:148]

O you who have believed, fear Allah and speak words of appropriate justiceHe will [then] amend for you your deeds and forgive you your sins. And whoever obeys Allah and His Messenger has certainly attained a great attainment. [Surah Al-‘Ahzab 33:70-71]

Allah Azza Wa Jaal and our beloved Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) teach us to speak kindly and use good words. If not, we shouldn’t be speaking at all. We need to careful in what we say and avoid harmful words because we should be aware of the fact we are accountable for what we see, hear, or say, on the Day of Judgement. In order to ensure we are speaking only good words, we need to avoid cursing, suspicion, false accusations, backbiting, gossiping, and so on. Whatever does not hold any goodness or benefit in it should not be spoken. In ‘shaa Allah may Allah guide us. Most of all, we need to take the initiative to improve our character and guard our tongues. 

(via islamreflection)

breakingfloor:

The Nurse and the Muslim Patient – A True Story from the United Kingdom——————————————————————————————————————————-My name is Cassie, I am 23 years old. I graduated as a qualified nurse this year and was given my first position as a home nurse.My patient was an English gentleman in his early 80s who suffered from Alzheimer’s. In the first meeting, the patient was given his record and from it I could see that he was a convert to the religion of Islam, therefore he was a Muslim.I knew from this that I would need to take into account some modes of treatment that may go against his faith, and therefore try to adapt my care to meet his needs. I brought in some ‘halal’ meat to cook for him and ensured that there was no pork or alcohol in the premises as I did some research which showed that these were forbidden in Islam.My patient was in a very advanced stage of his condition so a lot of my colleagues could not understand why I was going through so much effort for him. But I understood that a person who commits to a faith deserves that commitment to be respected, even if they are not in a position to understand.Anyway after a few weeks with my patient I began to notice some patterns of movement.At first I thought it was some copied motions he’s seen someone doing, but I saw him repeat the movement at particular time; morning, afternoon, evening.The movements were to raise his hands, bow and then put his head to the ground. I could not understand it. He was also repeating sentences in another language, I couldn’t figure out what language it was as his speech was slurred but I know the same verses were repeated daily.Also there was something strange, he didn’t allow me to feed him with my left hand (I am left-handed).Somehow I knew this linked to his religion but didn’t know how.One of my colleagues told me about paltalk as a place for debates and discussions and as I did not know any Muslims except for my patient I thought it would be good to speak to someone live and ask questions. I went on the Islam section and entered the room ‘True Message’.Here I asked questions regarding the repeated movements and was told that these were the actions of prayer. I did not really believe it until someone posted a link of the Islamic prayer on youtube.I was shocked.A man who has lost all memory of his children, of his occupation, and could barely eat and drink was able to remember not only actions of prayer but verses that were in another language.This was nothing short of incredible and I knew that this man was devout in his faith, which made me want to learn more in order to care for him the best I could.I came into the paltalk room as often as I could and was given a link to read the translation of the Quran and listen to it.The chapter of the ‘Bee’ gave me chills and I repeated it several times a day.I saved a recording of the Quran on my iPod and gave it to my patient to listen to, he was smiling and crying, and in reading the translation I could see why.I applied what I gained from paltalk to care for my patient but gradually found myself coming to the room to find answers for myself.I never really took the time to look at my life; I never knew my father, my mother died when I was 3, me and my brother were raised by our grandparents who died 4 years ago, so now its just the two of us.But despite all this loss, I always thought I was happy, content.It was only after spending time with my patient that felt like I was missing something. I was missing that sense of peace and tranquility my patient, even through suffering felt.I wanted that sense of belonging and a part of something that he felt, even with no one around him.I was given a list of mosques in my area by a lady on paltalk and went down to visit one. I watched the prayer and could not hold back my tears.mI felt drawn to the mosque every day and the imam and his wife would give me books and tapes and welcome any questions I had.Every question I asked at the mosque and on paltalk was answered with such clarity and depth that could do nothing but accept them.I have never practiced a faith but always believed that there was a God; I just did not know how to worship Him.One evening I came on paltalk and one of the speakers on the mic addressed me. He asked me if I have any questions, I said no. He asked if I was happy with the answers I was given, I said yes.He asked then what was stopping me accepting Islam, I could not answer.I went to the mosque to watch the dawn prayer. The imam asked me the same question, I could not answer.I then went to tend to my patient, I was feeding him and as I looked in his eyes I just realized, he was brought to me for a reason and the only thing stopping me from accepting was fear…. not fear in the sense of something bad, but fear of accepting something good, and thinking that I was not worthy like this man.That afternoon I went to the mosque and asked the imam if I could say my declaration of faith, the Shahadah.: lā ilāha illà al-Lāh, Muhammadun rasūlu Al-Lāh. There is no god except Allah, Muhammad is Allah’s messenger.He helped me through it and guided me through what I would need to do next.I cannot explain the feeling I felt when I said it.It was like someone woke me up from sleep and sees everything more clearly.The feeling was overwhelming joy, clarity and most of all…. peace.The first person I told was not my brother but my patient.I went to him, and before I even opened my mouth he cried and smiled at me.I broke down in front of him, I owed him so much.I came home logged on to paltalk and repeated the shahadah for the room.They all helped me so much and even though I had never seen a single one of them, they felt closer to me than my own brother.I did eventually call my brother to tell him and although he wasn’t happy, he supported me and said he would be there, I couldn’t ask for any more.After my first week as a Muslim my patient passed away in his sleep while I was caring for him. Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon.He died a peaceful death and I was the only person with him.He was like the father I never had and he was my doorway to Islam.From the day of my Shahadah to this very day and for every day for as long as I live, I will pray that Allah shows mercy on him and grant him every good deed I perform in the tenfold.I loved him for the sake of Allah and I pray each night to become an atoms weight of the Muslim he was.Islam is a religion with an open door; it is there for those who want to enter it…. Verily Allah is the Most Merciful, Most Kind.* Note * Our sister Cassie passed away October 2010 Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon, after she gave da’wa to her brother, who had accepted Islam Alhamdulillah.[Source: a da’wa organization in the UK]


May Allah grant her to JANNAH.. Amin.

breakingfloor:

The Nurse and the Muslim Patient – A True Story from the United Kingdom
——————————————————————————————————————————-
My name is Cassie, I am 23 years old. I graduated as a qualified nurse this year and was given my first position as a home nurse.

My patient was an English gentleman in his early 80s who suffered from Alzheimer’s. In the first meeting, the patient was given his record and from it I could see that he was a convert to the religion of Islam, therefore he was a Muslim.

I knew from this that I would need to take into account some modes of treatment that may go against his faith, and therefore try to adapt my care to meet his needs. I brought in some ‘halal’ meat to cook for him and ensured that there was no pork or alcohol in the premises as I did some research which showed that these were forbidden in Islam.

My patient was in a very advanced stage of his condition so a lot of my colleagues could not understand why I was going through so much effort for him. But I understood that a person who commits to a faith deserves that commitment to be respected, even if they are not in a position to understand.

Anyway after a few weeks with my patient I began to notice some patterns of movement.

At first I thought it was some copied motions he’s seen someone doing, but I saw him repeat the movement at particular time; morning, afternoon, evening.

The movements were to raise his hands, bow and then put his head to the ground. I could not understand it. He was also repeating sentences in another language, I couldn’t figure out what language it was as his speech was slurred but I know the same verses were repeated daily.

Also there was something strange, he didn’t allow me to feed him with my left hand (I am left-handed).

Somehow I knew this linked to his religion but didn’t know how.

One of my colleagues told me about paltalk as a place for debates and discussions and as I did not know any Muslims except for my patient I thought it would be good to speak to someone live and ask questions. I went on the Islam section and entered the room ‘True Message’.

Here I asked questions regarding the repeated movements and was told that these were the actions of prayer. I did not really believe it until someone posted a link of the Islamic prayer on youtube.

I was shocked.

A man who has lost all memory of his children, of his occupation, and could barely eat and drink was able to remember not only actions of prayer but verses that were in another language.

This was nothing short of incredible and I knew that this man was devout in his faith, which made me want to learn more in order to care for him the best I could.

I came into the paltalk room as often as I could and was given a link to read the translation of the Quran and listen to it.

The chapter of the ‘Bee’ gave me chills and I repeated it several times a day.

I saved a recording of the Quran on my iPod and gave it to my patient to listen to, he was smiling and crying, and in reading the translation I could see why.

I applied what I gained from paltalk to care for my patient but gradually found myself coming to the room to find answers for myself.

I never really took the time to look at my life; I never knew my father, my mother died when I was 3, me and my brother were raised by our grandparents who died 4 years ago, so now its just the two of us.

But despite all this loss, I always thought I was happy, content.

It was only after spending time with my patient that felt like I was missing something. I was missing that sense of peace and tranquility my patient, even through suffering felt.

I wanted that sense of belonging and a part of something that he felt, even with no one around him.

I was given a list of mosques in my area by a lady on paltalk and went down to visit one. I watched the prayer and could not hold back my tears.m

I felt drawn to the mosque every day and the imam and his wife would give me books and tapes and welcome any questions I had.

Every question I asked at the mosque and on paltalk was answered with such clarity and depth that could do nothing but accept them.

I have never practiced a faith but always believed that there was a God; I just did not know how to worship Him.

One evening I came on paltalk and one of the speakers on the mic addressed me. He asked me if I have any questions, I said no. He asked if I was happy with the answers I was given, I said yes.

He asked then what was stopping me accepting Islam, I could not answer.

I went to the mosque to watch the dawn prayer. The imam asked me the same question, I could not answer.

I then went to tend to my patient, I was feeding him and as I looked in his eyes I just realized, he was brought to me for a reason and the only thing stopping me from accepting was fear…. not fear in the sense of something bad, but fear of accepting something good, and thinking that I was not worthy like this man.

That afternoon I went to the mosque and asked the imam if I could say my declaration of faith, the Shahadah.: lā ilāha illà al-Lāh, Muhammadun rasūlu Al-Lāh. There is no god except Allah, Muhammad is Allah’s messenger.

He helped me through it and guided me through what I would need to do next.

I cannot explain the feeling I felt when I said it.

It was like someone woke me up from sleep and sees everything more clearly.

The feeling was overwhelming joy, clarity and most of all…. peace.

The first person I told was not my brother but my patient.

I went to him, and before I even opened my mouth he cried and smiled at me.

I broke down in front of him, I owed him so much.

I came home logged on to paltalk and repeated the shahadah for the room.

They all helped me so much and even though I had never seen a single one of them, they felt closer to me than my own brother.

I did eventually call my brother to tell him and although he wasn’t happy, he supported me and said he would be there, I couldn’t ask for any more.

After my first week as a Muslim my patient passed away in his sleep while I was caring for him. Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon.

He died a peaceful death and I was the only person with him.

He was like the father I never had and he was my doorway to Islam.

From the day of my Shahadah to this very day and for every day for as long as I live, I will pray that Allah shows mercy on him and grant him every good deed I perform in the tenfold.

I loved him for the sake of Allah and I pray each night to become an atoms weight of the Muslim he was.

Islam is a religion with an open door; it is there for those who want to enter it…. Verily Allah is the Most Merciful, Most Kind.

* Note * Our sister Cassie passed away October 2010 Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon, after she gave da’wa to her brother, who had accepted Islam Alhamdulillah.

[Source: a da’wa organization in the UK]

May Allah grant her to JANNAH.. Amin.

(via itsherlove)

Sebenarnya, Al Qur’an itu adalah ayat-ayat yang nyata di dalam dada orang-orang yang diberi ilmu. Dan tidak ada yang mengingkari ayat-ayat Kami kecuali orang-orang yang zalim. - Al’Ankabuut, 49

Sebenarnya, Al Qur’an itu adalah ayat-ayat yang nyata di dalam dada orang-orang yang diberi ilmu. Dan tidak ada yang mengingkari ayat-ayat Kami kecuali orang-orang yang zalim. - Al’Ankabuut, 49

(Source: tiramira93, via silentloverofallah)

islamic-quotes:

Fear Allah

Sesungguhnya orang-orang yang beriman itu adalah mereka yang apabila disebut nama Allah gemetarlah hati mereka, dan apabila dibacakan kepada mereka ayat-ayat-Nya bertambahlah iman mereka (karenanya) dan kepada Tuhan-lah mereka bertawaka. - Al Anfaal,2

islamic-quotes:

Fear Allah

Sesungguhnya orang-orang yang beriman itu adalah mereka yang apabila disebut nama Allah gemetarlah hati mereka, dan apabila dibacakan kepada mereka ayat-ayat-Nya bertambahlah iman mereka (karenanya) dan kepada Tuhan-lah mereka bertawaka. - Al Anfaal,2

invitetoislam:

Dua for The Night of Power:
Allahumma innaka afuwwun kareemun tuhibbul afwa fa’fu anni
Oh Allah certainly you are Most Forgiving, You love to Forgive, so Forgive me.

Please forgive me, ya Rabb..

invitetoislam:

Dua for The Night of Power:

Allahumma innaka afuwwun kareemun tuhibbul afwa fa’fu anni

Oh Allah certainly you are Most Forgiving, You love to Forgive, so Forgive me.

Please forgive me, ya Rabb..

(via islamic-quotes)

When you feel lonely, recall how Adam (as) felt when he was sent to this earth alone.

When you can’t see any logic in what’s going on, and questions arise, recall Nūḥ (as) who built the biggest ship on dry land without questioning.

When you find your parents opposing you (in dīn), recall Ibrāhīm (as) who was thrown into a blazing fire by his father.

When you are hurt by your own, recall Yūsuf (as) who was betrayed by his own brothers.

When you are ill and your whole body cries with pain, recall Ayyūb (as) who was so sick that insects would eat from his sick decaying body.

When you’re stuck, and cannot find a way out, recall Yūnus (as) who was stuck inside the belly of a whale.

When you’re mocked, abused, and taunted by your own, just because you adopted dīn over dunyā, recall Muḥammad (saw) who faced much worse.

—(via protocolboy)

Recall

(Source: islamreflection, via hidayahmilikallah)

"Candy cabbie" Mansoor Khalid gives passengers as much candy as they want.

Now that’s one sweet ride.

Taxi driver Mansoor Khalid is on a one-man mission to cheer up New Yorkers with a daily dose of candy.

“The New York life is not the easy life,” Khalid, 36, told the Daily News. “People are depressed. I see a lot of people stressed sitting back there.”

Khalid is no stranger to stress. He dubbed his taxi the NYC Candy Cab after his 2-year-old son died in April from a long battle with heart disease.

“I learned a lot of things,” he said of the trauma of losing his child, who underwent two heart transplants and lost a kidney before he passed away. “Life is too short.”

Khalid, who moved to New York from Pakistan in 1993 and has been driving a cab since 1997, had already seen the impact of small acts of generosity. During the two years he spent in the hospital with his son, he routinely brought coffee and desserts to the doctors and nurses when he got off his shift at 1 a.m.

"They got so happy when in the middle of the night I gave every person coffee," he said. “I was so nice to them and they were so nice to me.”

After his son died, Khalid decided to bring his routine to the people he interacted with every day in his cab.

Khalid said he was inspired to do something sweet after the death of his 2-year-old son.

“I was very depressed, losing my little boy,” he said. “Somehow, God gave me this idea. Now (I’m) chit-chatting and time is flying by!”

Though he doesn’t eat much candy himself — “Skittles, only” — Khalid offers a wide variety of sweets, and has started cataloguing his collection on Instagram. Fans can also follow him on Twitter (@CandyCabNYC), and he may even start a blog for his growing following.

One such fan was thrilled to discover the cab on a late night out last weekend, and quickly spread the word about him through social media.

“We all started freaking out,” said David Weiner, 27. “You don’t see piles of candy like that in adulthood. It’s just one of those things that reminds you you’re in New York and anything can happen.”

And Khalid’s unusual project has the full support of the city.

"We encourage drivers to go the extra mile in the name of customer service, and Mr. Khalid certainly does this," said Taxi and Limousine Commission boss David Yassky. “We appreciate the loyalty he inspires in his passengers."

Loyalty isn’t the goal, considering that Khalid responds to every hail, candy or no candy. His mission is to spread warmth.

"It’s a little thing,” he said, “but people get happy.”

Be kind.. It’s sunnah..

(Source: New York Daily News, via thebeautyofislam)